Albrecht Dürer

More »
Albrecht Dürer (German pronunciation: [ˈalbʁɛçt ˈdyːʁɐ]; 21 May 1471 – 6 April 1528)[1] was a German painter, printmaker, mathematician, engraver, and theorist from Nuremberg. His prints established his reputation across Europe when he was still in his twenties, and he has been conventionally regarded as the greatest artist of the Northern Renaissance ever since. His vast body of work includes altarpieces and religious works, numerous portraits and self-portraits, and copper engravings. His woodcuts, such as the Apocalypse series (1498), retain a more Gothic flavour than the rest of his work. His well-known works include the Knight, Death, and the Devil (1513), Saint Jerome in his Study (1514) and Melencolia I (1514), which has been the subject of extensive analysis and interpretation. His watercolours mark him as one of the first European landscape artists, while his ambitious woodcuts revolutionized the potential of that medium.

Reference:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albrecht_Dürer
angels
750x10304420
angel
770x10045115
church
1034x6904402
crucif
605x8123949
dresse
701x11285085
father
850x11155127
hare
850x9435939
mother
823x10944409
self13
704x10004202
veneti
802x10764093
archit
708x10214104
asclep
650x10245053
father
802x10493689
hair l
801x10383450
jerome
750x10413991
mill
1120x7504548
selfba
805x7757960
speyer
832x10737088
turf
770x10163912
animal
701x9174492